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Montevideo American-News
  • Letters to the Editor, Thursday, December 12

  • The American-News welcomes letters of opinion from our readers. Letters regarding current local and national news items are encouraged. All letters are subject to editing for length and style. Letters containing potentially libelous or obscene statements will not be published. Letters must contain name, address and phone numb...
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  • The American-News welcomes letters of opinion from our readers. Letters regarding current local and national news items are encouraged. All letters are subject to editing for length and style. Letters containing potentially libelous or obscene statements will not be published. Letters must contain name, address and phone number for verification and in case of questions. E-mail letters to:  jjones@montenews.com Letters may also be mailed to:  Editor, Montevideo Publishing, P.O. Box 99, Montevideo, MN 56265
    A lie is a lie
    When is a lie not a lie? Is it when the President of the United States tells it? When is fraud not fraud? Is it when the President of the United States perpetrates it?
    The answer is a lie is a lie and fraud is fraud, whether told by the humblest citizen or the most exalted leader.
    Part of some people’s inability to call lies, what the president has told us in his health care falsehoods, is the amount of themselves they have invested in him. It is because in every presidential election cycle we are looking for and expecting more than a human being. Too often we are looking for a messiah, a national tinsel-bedecked father figure to lead us out of the morasses that we have wandered into. When our then proclaimed emperor turns out to have no clothing, we continue on for some time in the denial of his nakedness.
    It does not help our leaders to have adoring sycophants around them who continually tell them they can do no wrong and that their walk, unlike any other human, is blameless. Take, for example, a quote attributed to Valerie Jarrett, President Obama’s longtime advisor concerning her idol: “He knows exactly how smart he is ... I think he has never been challenged intellectually .. he’s been bored to death his whole life. He is just too talented to do what ordinary people do. He would never be satisfied with what ordinary people do.”
    Give me a break! There is most probably a farmer somewhere in North Dakota who is more intellectually capable than Barak Obama. In life you must be careful that you do not fall for your own propaganda. Our failures often are woven intricately into our masterful intellect and manifest themselves in pride, ego and bitter vindictiveness against those we assume are raining on our most treasured parade.
    As far as the health care debacle is concerned, a true genius, Michelangelo, is alleged to have expressed it perfectly many years ago. He was doing a work of art which was not coming out well. He destroyed it completely and then commented to his astonished audience, “If the wine is sour, thow it out.”
    Page 2 of 3 - President Obama will not discard this very sour concoction however, because from the beginning it had little to do with good health care but a lot to do with the ideological agenda of redistribution of wealth. The bill would have never been passed into law had he not lied about the effects of it.
    —Doug Hodge
    Montevideo
    Schools are being re-payed
    Dear friends and neighbors,
    Today, Minnesota Management and Budget announced that the November forecast shows a projected budget surplus of $1.08 billion for fiscal years 2014-15.
    The first $246 million of the surplus will be used to completely re-pay the billions that were borrowed from our schools; which were decisions made by previous legislatures. After paying back the shift, our state’s balance will still be $825 million to the positive.
    One of my top priorities last legislative session was paying back the money borrowed from our schools. This required raising taxes, cutting spending, and reforming the way our state did business. None of these choices were easy, but they were necessary to put our state on solid financial footing and to pay back the obligations we owed.
    To recap, at this time last year, we faced a $600 million deficit and an $800 million IOU to our schools. By working with Governor Mark Dayton, the Democratically controlled legislature made historic investments in jobs, all day kindergarten, higher education, and passed a fair and honest budget without shifts and gimmicks.
    The forecast also revealed that Minnesota’s economy continues to strengthen. Minnesota’s unemployment rate is down to 4.8 percent and in August, the state had recovered all of the jobs lost during the recession. However, more work still needs to be done. Most of the economic gains of the recovery have gone to the wealthy and income inequality is still a major concern. I will continue to be a tireless advocate for a strong and expanding middle-class.
    The 2014 Legislative Session begins on February 25. Please contact me with any thoughts, concerns, questions, or suggestions you have. Please reach me by phone at 651-296-4228 or email at rep.andrew.falk@house.mn
    —Rep. Andrew Falk
    Murdock
    Help your letter carriers
    Winter is back in full swing, with significant snow and ice for all of us to battle.
    This means slippery surfaces, which can be dangerous and costly for homeowners, as well as for their visitors — including their letter carrier. By clearing a path when the snow arrives, accidents can be prevented.
    We need our customers’ help. Letter carriers have hurt their knees or backs, or even suffered broken bones from falls on slippery surfaces.
    Letter carriers are instructed to use good judgement when attempting to deliver to addresses where ice and snow are not cleared. They are not allowed to dismount to make curb deliveries when the approach to the mailbox is hazardous because of snow or ice.
    Page 3 of 3 - No one wants to inconvenience a customer. But we have to take every possible step to ensure the safety of our employees.
    Some tips:
    • Customers are asked to clear enough snow from curbside boxes — at least 6 feet on both sides of the mailbox — so the carrier may approach and leave without backing up his or her vehicle.
    • Walkways need to be cleared so as to allow enough traction to avoid slips, trips and falls.
    • Steps, especially painted wood, must be kept clear of ice and snow and in good repair.
    • Overhands must be clear and free of snow and ice to avoid injury.
    The best cure for an injury is to not have it occur in the first place. Please help your letter carrier provide you with the best possible service — safely.
    —Rebecca Johnson
    Postmaster, Montevideo

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