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Montevideo American-News - Montevideo, MN
  • City, county support construction of medical cannabis manufacturing and distribution facility

  • On the heels of the Minnesota House and Senate passing a medical cannabis bill, the Montevideo City Council and the Chippewa County Board of Commissioners have passed resolutions supporting the construction of a medical cannabis manufacturing and distribution facility in Montevideo and Chippewa County.
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  • On the heels of the Minnesota House and Senate passing a medical cannabis bill, the Montevideo City Council and the Chippewa County Board of Commissioners have passed resolutions supporting the construction of a medical cannabis manufacturing and distribution facility in Montevideo and Chippewa County.
     
    The bill
    Gov. Mark Dayton has said he’ll sign a deal put together by state lawmakers, which would legalize medical cannabis in Minnesota. The move to allow medical marijuana in Minnesota has had strong bipartisan support, but to this point Gov. Dayton has withheld support, citing enforcement concerns and health concerns.
     
    The new law does not allow smoking of marijuana, only vaporizing the cannabis extract and ingesting pills and oils. The law also gives law enforcement more tools to go after those who violate the law, along with stricter penalties. No cannabis plant will be distributed.
    The drug will be available to residents diagnosed with one of ten different ailments, including: cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Tourette’s syndrome, ALS, seizures, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease and other terminal illnesses. The family of eight year old Montevideo resident Katelyn Pauling hope medical marijuana will help reduce the trauma of her daily seizures.
    The oil form of medical marijuana they want for their daughter has the THC removed, and cannot get her high.
     
    Jeremy Pauling, father of Katelyn Pauling, said he recently spoke with law enforcement officers to learn more about why there were enforcement issues with medical marijuana. “Two and a half ounces is a big bag of marijuana,” Pauling said he learned. “That’s a lot to possibly have in circulation.”
     
    Pauling had spent much of his time at the state capital over the last 10 weeks, working with lawmakers and lobbying to create a workable bill. After learning about the concerns of law enforcement, Pauling said he became more in favor of the current bill, which restricts medical marijuana more than any other state which has legalized it.
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    Those seeking a medical cannabis prescription will not be able to receive it from their doctor. A request will have to be made to the Department of Health, which will check medical records to be sure the individual has one of the cleared diagnosis. There will be a prescription already prepared for each diagnoses, which means patients will not be able to ask for a different dosage or method. Records on who is cleared for medical cannabis will be kept digitally so that they can be accessed.
     
    “I’m happy that we’re going to get the medication (for our daughter), but at the same time there are some people left behind,” said Jeremy Pauling. “But they’re going to be using this method as a study, to learn more about what works with diseases. Over time they will add more diagnoses.”
     
    A 23 member taskforce that will include doctors, public safety professionals and patients will analyze the progress of patients
    See Facility page 9A

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