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Montevideo American-News - Montevideo, MN
This blog relates to life observations before and after age 50. Basically how change is inevitable and affects the way we see things
I Guess I'm Not Cut Out for the Big City
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About this blog
By Lori Broschat
I am a Devils Lake native, a recipient of three college degrees including a Master of Divinity from Asbury Theological Seminary. I have been a pastor in the United Methodist Church since 1997 and I was appointed to my home church in Devils Lake in ...
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This Side of 50
I am a Devils Lake native, a recipient of three college degrees including a Master of Divinity from Asbury Theological Seminary. I have been a pastor in the United Methodist Church since 1997 and I was appointed to my home church in Devils Lake in July 2014. I love to write and have some published works. Blogging is a hobby of mine and this will be my third blog. I have a grown daughter named Ashley who is a student and sometime resident of Devils Lake. I am a movie buff, an Anglophile, and I possess more books than I have time to read!
Recent Posts
Sept. 19, 2014 5:50 p.m.
Sept. 15, 2014 12:01 a.m.
Sept. 11, 2014 5:50 a.m.
Sept. 9, 2014 12:30 a.m.
Sept. 4, 2014 5:45 p.m.
Aug. 25, 2014 12:01 a.m.

I just spent a portion of the weekend in Canada, which in itself is perfectly ordinary.  What is not so ordinary is the way in which I spent a majority of Saturday night.  I went to Winnipeg to pick up my daughter at the airport, but first I had to find my hotel.  For whatever reason I did not choose a hotel close to the airport, which is relatively easy for me to find.



No, I had booked a hotel probably chosen by price, because I'm cheap, or by review, because my daughter puts a lot of stock in reviews.  It was clear I did not choose it by location, for if I had paid more attention I would have never chosen it.  It was far downtown in an area I've never been to, and it was a complicated drive, even without the construction and closed lanes, etc.  By the time I arrived in Winnipeg it was raining and getting dark.



My directions from Google Maps were very confusing, especially since I don't like city driving.  I kept looking for the streets listed on my directions, but I never did find them.  If you've not been to Winnipeg let me just say that unless the roads are major thoroughfares, the signage is so small as to require binoculars.  As the rain got heavier and the night grew darker and the hour grew later I began to panic a bit.  Unfamiliar as I am with downtown Winnipeg I was confused by the layout of streets that branch off of one another in diagonal as well as perpendicular directions.



This added to my confusion and so I reversed my course many times, asked for directions three times, and actually ended up going the wrong way down a one-way street twice.  I'm not proud of it, but it's a weakness of mine.  I'm just not cut out for city life.  Well, most cities anyway.  I have successfully navigated Lexington, Kentucky dozens, perhaps hundreds of times without issue.  Lexington is laid out in the most ingenious way so that if you exit the road encircling the city you can find your route easily.



This phenomenon of my getting lost spans many states; North Carolina, Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, and yes, even Kentucky.  Michigan probably holds the record for longest time lost ever.  My daughter and I spent approximately five hours trying to locate our hotel in Plymouth, in the rain, of course, and at night.  As it turned out, we were just one highway over from where we should have been.  In Illinois, moving to Kentucky, I missed my exit four times and ran out of cash for the toll booth.  I had to beg the attendant to let me through on the fifth time.



No, I'm not proud of my directional challenge, but hopefully there will be a cure some day.  Perhaps if enough of us come forward and own up to our problem we can never get lost alone!

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