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Montevideo American-News - Montevideo, MN
  • Toxic algae in Lac qui Parle Lake in Milan

  • ‘Blue-green’ algae has showed up on Lac qui Parle Lake west of Milan. The growth was noticed and announced by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.
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  • ‘Blue-green’ algae has showed up on Lac qui Parle Lake west of Milan. The growth was noticed and announced by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.   Blue-green algae can be toxic to humans and animals, like pets and livestock, if ingested. MPCA agents suggest that pet owners avoid lakes or bodies of still, slow moving water where blue-green algae is most likely to appear.    If animals do find their way into the algae, according to the MPCA, make sure to hose down the animal before it can wash itself with its tongue. Pets become ill from such toxins when ingested, so prevention is in prohibiting animals to drink potentially toxic water or licking it off their bodies. As for people, its best avoiding swimming in water even suspected of harboring blue-green algae. Avoid any hint of it, which can appear like green paint or pea soup, according to the MPCA.    Blooms of blue-green, toxic algae, arrive when an excess of nutrients and chemicals from fertilizers, farm and yard waste. Once a bloom is established, there is no way to remedy it. All that can be done is to wait for it to subside, kepe people and animals away, and monitor the amount of runoff that flows into slow-moving bodies of water.    Should an animal or person ingest or come into a great deal of contact with this blue-green algae (which for people typically means the sudden onset of a scratchy throat), contact a veterinarian or clinic immediately.     
    Blue-green algae can be toxic to humans and animals, like pets and livestock, if ingested. MPCA agents suggest that pet owners avoid lakes or bodies of still, slow moving water where blue-green algae is most likely to appear.    If animals do find their way into the algae, according to the MPCA, make sure to hose down the animal before it can wash itself with its tongue. Pets become ill from such toxins when ingested, so prevention is in prohibiting animals to drink potentially toxic water or licking it off their bodies. As for people, its best avoiding swimming in water even suspected of harboring blue-green algae. Avoid any hint of it, which can appear like green paint or pea soup, according to the MPCA.    Blooms of blue-green, toxic algae, arrive when an excess of nutrients and chemicals from fertilizers, farm and yard waste. Once a bloom is established, there is no way to remedy it. All that can be done is to wait for it to subside, kepe people and animals away, and monitor the amount of runoff that flows into slow-moving bodies of water.    Should an animal or person ingest or come into a great deal of contact with this blue-green algae (which for people typically means the sudden onset of a scratchy throat), contact a veterinarian or clinic immediately.   

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