As summer field activities wind down, harvest will soon be in full swing.

As summer field activities wind down, harvest will soon be in full swing. The University of Minnesota Extension Office urges farmers to take the time now to mow fenceline weeds to prevent or minimize seed production. Fencelines are often where weed infestations start. By eliminating fenceline weeds, we prevent combine harvesters from picking up weed seeds from the field edges and pulling them into the field, where they can be further spread by harvesting and tillage equipment.

Most weeds common to corn and soybean fields are in the flowering and seed development stages of their life cycle. This means that there is still time to control some fenceline weeds before they are able to produce viable seed. Viable seeds may have already been produced by early-maturing broadleaf weeds like lambsquarters, kochia, and redroot pigweed, but later-maturing weeds like giant and common ragweed have just begun pollinating in many areas of Minnesota. Waterhemp and other pigweed species are able to produce viable seed within 10 days of pollination according to University of Illinois research, so it is important to control weeds soon after they begin flowering.

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